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Review: PhotoSize tells you when apps cheat you out of pixels

Submitted by on February 26, 2010 – 10:40 am

PhotoSize
Version 1.0

Rating 4 stars

Bottom Line: Essential if you regularly buy photo apps

PhotoSize

PhotoSize

PhotoSize by Danny Goodman is a utility that does one thing — it gives you the pixel dimensions of any image from your iPhone’s photo library or camera roll.

Previously, checking this info might involve emailing the image from one of the third-party apps that can email a photo without downsizing it and then opening the image on your computer in Photoshop, or checking the pixel dimensions using Photogene’s Crop tool. With PhotoSize, simply choose an image from your iPhone and PhotoSize quickly and easily tells you the pixel dimensions.

PhotoSize screenshot

PhotoSize screenshot

PhotoSize was created to check if other photo editing apps reduce the pixel dimensions of an image. There are many photo apps in the App Store which reduce the image size down to 768 x 1024, 800 x 600, or even 320 x 480 pixels — rendering them unusable for printing, and in many cases unusable for anything but MMS. Also, many zoom lens apps are simply in-app cropping tools, drastically reducing the size of the image as it crops it in.

Many times, these developers don’t include the resolution specs in their app store descriptions. PhotoSize quickly checks what the app is doing with your pixels so you don’t waste time or another photo opportunity with an app that strips pixels.

The app is fast and stable with the standard 2 MP and 3 MP images that the iPhone shoots. However, on my 2G, it crashed while opening the larger resampled images 2400 x 3200 7.0 megapixel images that HD Camera creates. For the 1920 x 2560 5.0 megapixel images created by 5.0 MPX Camera, it would work with one image before crashing. This isn’t a big concern at the moment because very few iPhoneographers use the resolution-enhancing cameras. It could become a bigger issue, though, if more resolution enhancement apps are released. Regardless, odds are that iPhone images will only get bigger. I’d like to see the memory issue addressed in a future update.

PhotoSize is free. The banner ads by AdMob are small and unobtrusive at the bottom of the screen.

Photos you intend to print need the highest resolution possible. There are apps with some really cool effects that save images at unusable resolutions. PhotoSize is an essential tool not just for your images, but to keep tabs on what your photo editor apps are doing with your images.

PhotoSize is now one of the first steps I take when testing a new app.

App Store link: PhotoSize

=M=

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Marty Yawnick

Marty is a self-employed graphic designer in the Fort Worth/Dallas Metroplex. He is an avid Rangers baseball, Chicago Cubs, Packers and Highbury Arsenal fan. In addition to capturing random moments with whatever camera is close by (usually his iPhone), his other interests include coffee, film, music, and traveling in seats 5E and 5F with his fiancé.